Moon

The Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth and the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System. It is the largest natural satellite of a planet in the Solar System relative to the size of its primary, having a quarter the diameter of Earth. The Moon is the second densest satellite after Io, a satellite of Jupiter. It is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face; the near side is marked with dark volcanic maria among the bright ancient crustal highlands and prominent impact craters. It is the brightest object in the sky after the Sun, although its surface is actually very dark, with a similar reflectance to coal. Its prominence in the sky and its regular cycle of phases have, since ancient times, made the Moon an important cultural influence on language, calendars, art and mythology.

By visiting this site; you too can enjoy the unique events I've been privileged to witness. You will also have the opportunity to purchase your favourite prints or enjoy these images on a variety of products to remind you of the unique world in which we all live...Enjoy!!

Halloween Moon # 0002

Lunar phases are the result of looking at the illuminated half of the Moon from different viewing geometries; they are not caused by the shadow of the Earth or umbra falling on the Moon's surface (this occurs only during a lunar eclipse) The Moon exhibits different phases as the relative position of the Sun, Earth and Moon changes, appearing as a full moon when the Sun and Moon are on opposite sides of the Earth and as a new moon (dark moon) when they are on the same side. The phases of full moon and new moon are examples of syzygies, which occur when the Earth, Moon, and Sun lie (approximately) in a straight line. The time between two full m
© Allan Bell

Moon @ Yarrowford # 2475

The Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth and the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System. It is the largest natural satellite of a planet in the Solar System relative to the size of its primary, having a quarter the diameter of Earth. The Moon is the second densest satellite after Io, a satellite of Jupiter. It is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face; the near side is marked with dark volcanic maria among the bright ancient crustal highlands and prominent impact craters. It is the brightest object in the sky after the Sun, although its surface is actually very dark, with a similar reflectance to coal
© Allan Bell

Waxing Moon # 1812

The appearance of the moon changes during the lunar cycle, which spans 29.5 days. The moon is a spherical, non-luminous, reflective body. As it revolves around the Earth's orbit, the moon rotates just like the Earth but in the opposite direction. It is the reflection of the sun and shading by the Earth during revolution that causes the lunar cycle. This cycle is commonly broken down into eight phases. Five phases describe the waxing portion of the lunar cycle.
© Allan Bell

Waxing Gibbous Moon # 8219

The waxing gibbous moon occurs between the first quarter and the full moon. The sun illuminates more than half of the Moon's surface during this period.
© Allan Bell

Moon Phases# 0001

Lunar phases are the result of looking at the illuminated half of the Moon from different viewing geometries; they are not caused by the shadow of the Earth or umbra falling on the Moon's surface (this occurs only during a lunar eclipse) The Moon exhibits different phases as the relative position of the Sun, Earth and Moon changes, appearing as a full moon when the Sun and Moon are on opposite sides of the Earth and as a new moon (dark moon) when they are on the same side. The phases of full moon and new moon are examples of syzygies, which occur when the Earth, Moon, and Sun lie (approximately) in a straight line. The time between two full m
© Allan Bell

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© Allan Bell