Waterfalls

A waterfall is a place where flowing water rapidly drops in elevation as it flows over a steep region or a cliff. Waterfalls are commonly formed when a river is young. At these times the channel is often narrow and deep. When the river courses over resistant bedrock, erosion happens slowly, while downstream the erosion occurs more rapidly. As the watercourse increases its velocity at the edge of the waterfall, it plucks material from the riverbed. Whirlpools created in the turbulence as well as sand and stones carried by the watercourse increase the erosion capacity. This causes the waterfall to carve deeper into the bed and to recede upstream.

By visiting this site; you too can enjoy the unique events I've been privileged to witness. You will also have the opportunity to purchase your favourite prints or enjoy these images on a variety of products to remind you of the unique world in which we all live...Enjoy!!

Church @ South Loch Earnhead # 6786

If your interested in geology and waterfalls; they travel to the south end of Loch Earnhead. Turn right at this church and follow the single track to park at the twin arch bridge approximately 1.5miles up the road.
© Allan Bell

Twin Arch Bridge @ Loch Earnhead # 6741

Travelled to the twin arch bridge at the south end of Loch Earnhead with my daughter Polly to see some dramatic geology with a fantastic but rather dangerous waterfall.
© Allan Bell

Twin Arch Bridge @ Loch Earnhead # 6666

The upstream side of the twin arch bridge is an adventure play area for kids but extreme caution must be taken when the river is swollen with flood water. Parental supervision at all times.
© Allan Bell

Waterfall & Geology @ Loch Earnhead # 6696

The downstream side of the twin arch bridge with shallow pool area is not recommended for the kids because the flowing water descends rapidly into a spirraling cascade of dramatic waterfall. Getting into position to shoot this series of photographs is not for the faint hearted. Proceed with caution.
© Allan Bell

Waterfall & Geology @ Loch Earnhead # 6698

The downstream side of the twin arch bridge with shallow pool area is not recommended for the kids because the flowing water descends rapidly into a spirraling cascade of dramatic waterfall. Getting into position to shoot this series of photographs is not for the faint hearted. Proceed with caution.
© Allan Bell

Waterfall & Geology @ Loch Earnhead # 6701

The downstream side of the twin arch bridge with shallow pool area is not recommended for the kids because the flowing water descends rapidly into a spirraling cascade of dramatic waterfall. Getting into position to shoot this series of photographs is not for the faint hearted. Proceed with caution.
© Allan Bell

Meigle Burn @ Caddonfoot # 0011

A waterfall is a place where flowing water rapidly drops in elevation as it flows over a steep region or a cliff. Waterfalls are commonly formed when a river is young. At these times the channel is often narrow and deep. When the river courses over resistant bedrock, erosion happens slowly, while downstream the erosion occurs more rapidly. As the watercourse increases its velocity at the edge of the waterfall, it plucks material from the riverbed. Whirlpools created in the turbulence as well as sand and stones carried by the watercourse increase the erosion capacity. This causes the waterfall to carve deeper into the bed and to recede upstrea
© Allan Bell

Meigle Burn @ Caddonfoot # 0012

A waterfall is a place where flowing water rapidly drops in elevation as it flows over a steep region or a cliff. Waterfalls are commonly formed when a river is young. At these times the channel is often narrow and deep. When the river courses over resistant bedrock, erosion happens slowly, while downstream the erosion occurs more rapidly. As the watercourse increases its velocity at the edge of the waterfall, it plucks material from the riverbed. Whirlpools created in the turbulence as well as sand and stones carried by the watercourse increase the erosion capacity. This causes the waterfall to carve deeper into the bed and to recede upstrea
© Allan Bell

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© Allan Bell