Brown Hares

The main habitat of the Brown Hare in Britain is open farmland. Unlike Rabbits, hares do not dig and burrow into the ground, but instead live their whole lives above ground. They do not have a particular 'home' and will sleep in any suitable place, continually shifting from one place to another. When a hare rests, it will usually scrape away the vegetation and then lie down on the bare earth. The hare scrapes a shallow depression which is deeper and wider at the back than at the front. This is known as a "Form". They are often made in the shelter of a grassy tussock or a rock which will give some protection from the wind.

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Brown Hare # 0790

They can run incredibly fast, up to 45 miles per hour, although this is saved for escape and they generally lope along at a much more leisurely pace.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 0293

The ears of the European hare are greyish white inside and have black tips on the top ends. It also has long hind feet. Most of the hare’s body is covered in yellowish-brown to greyish-brown fur but has greyish-white fur on the underside. The face is brown with black rings around the eyes.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 0933

The ears of the European hare are greyish white inside and have black tips on the top ends. It also has long hind feet. Most of the hare’s body is covered in yellowish-brown to greyish-brown fur but has greyish-white fur on the underside. The face is brown with black rings around the eyes.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 0908

The ears of the European hare are greyish white inside and have black tips on the top ends. It also has long hind feet. Most of the hare’s body is covered in yellowish-brown to greyish-brown fur but has greyish-white fur on the underside. The face is brown with black rings around the eyes.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 0924

Brown Hares primarily live in open fields and pasture usually near agricultural areas and bordered by hedgerows and woodlots. They prefer to live in shallow forms like clumps of grass, weeds or brush.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 0210

Hares primarily live in open fields and pasture usually near agricultural areas and bordered by hedgerows and woodlots. They prefer to live in shallow forms like clumps of grass, weeds or brush.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 1036

Have spent many days tracking down Brown Hares in the border pastures. I can confirm that they run incredibly fast, up to 45 miles per hour, although this is saved for escape and they generally lope along at a much more leisurely pace.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 1069

Have spent many days tracking down the Brown Hares.The challenge was finding a way to get close enough to see the twinkle in it's big eye. On this ocassion I spotted a hare rummaging around in the hedgerow; this gave me the opportunity to make a stealthy approach while blending into the hedgerow undergrowth.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 1066

Have spent many days tracking down the Brown Hares.The challenge was finding a way to get close enough to see the twinkle in it's big eye. On this ocassion I spotted a hare rummaging around in the hedgerow; this gave me the opportunity to make a stealthy approach while blending into the hedgerow undergrowth.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare # 1077

The structure of the brown hare resembles that of the rabbit, but obvious differences include the hare's longer, larger body, much longer hind legs, and longer ears with black tips. Generally, brown hares are a brown-russet colour, with a white underside. The tail is black on the upper surface and white underneath. In contrast to rabbits, which have a brown iris, the brown hare has a golden iris and a black pupil.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Hermiston # 1387

Brown hares spend the winter months snuggling together for body warmth on exposed grasslands, the normally shy animals are most active in march / april when the ‘boxing’ displays are quite a site.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Hermiston # 1396

Having spent the winter months snuggling together for body warmth on exposed grasslands, the normally shy animals are out now enjoying the warm sun on their backs.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2158

Brown hares don’t store enough fat in their bodies to survive over winter, and need a constant food supply throughout the year. Preferring wild grasses and herbs to eat.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2168

When disturbed, the brown hare can run incredibly fast, up to 35 miles per hour, although this is saved for escape and they generally lope along at a much more leisurely pace.
© Allan Bell

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© Allan Bell