Brown Hares

The main habitat of the Brown Hare in Britain is open farmland. Unlike Rabbits, hares do not dig and burrow into the ground, but instead live their whole lives above ground. They do not have a particular 'home' and will sleep in any suitable place, continually shifting from one place to another. When a hare rests, it will usually scrape away the vegetation and then lie down on the bare earth. The hare scrapes a shallow depression which is deeper and wider at the back than at the front. This is known as a "Form". They are often made in the shelter of a grassy tussock or a rock which will give some protection from the wind.

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Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2240

The preferred habitat of the brown hare includes arable farmland (especially land managed for cereals, ley farming, upland pasture), long grasslands, hedgerows, woodland and ditches.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2264

Strong hind legs enable brown hares to propel themselves along at speeds up to 45mph with acute changes of direction when escaping wild photographers!! or predators
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2285

Brown hares eat plant like food. They have two pairs of sharp front teeth, which they use to nibble their food.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2292

Brown hares eat plant like food. They have two pairs of sharp front teeth, which they use to nibble their food.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2313

Brown Hare with warm-coloured brown fur with orangey-yellow fur on face, throat and flanks. Black-tipped ears; large, staring eyes. Long, powerful hind legs.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2376

The structure of the brown hare resembles that of the rabbit, but obvious differences include the hare's longer, larger body, much longer hind legs, and longer ears with black tips. Generally, brown hares are a brown-russet colour, with a white underside. The tail is black on the upper surface and white underneath. In contrast to rabbits, which have a brown iris, the brown hare has a golden iris and a black pupil.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 2363

The structure of the brown hare resembles that of the rabbit, but obvious differences include the hare's longer, larger body, much longer hind legs, and longer ears with black tips. Generally, brown hares are a brown-russet colour, with a white underside. The tail is black on the upper surface and white underneath. In contrast to rabbits, which have a brown iris, the brown hare has a golden iris and a black pupil.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Hermiston # 2624

Brown Hares graze on vegetation and nibble bark from young trees and bushes. Hares shelter in a 'form', which is simply a shallow depression in the ground or grasses, when disturbed they lie perfectly still with ears pressed back along their body.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Greenhill # 3058

Brown Hares graze on vegetation and nibble bark from young trees and bushes. Hares shelter in a 'form', which is simply a shallow depression in the ground or grasses, when disturbed they lie perfectly still with ears pressed back along their body.
© Allan Bell

Brown Hare @ Hermiston # 3111

Checked out the Brown Hare trail close to Hermiston; very wet overnight with morning mist lingering. Only a couple of hares present but very passive.
© Allan Bell

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© Allan Bell