Owls

Owls are a group of birds that belong to the order Strigiformes.
Owls have large forward-facing eyes and ear-holes; a hawk-like beak; a flat face; and usually a conspicuous circle of feathers, a facial disc, around each eye. The feathers making up this disc can be adjusted in order to sharply focus sounds that come from varying distances onto the owls' asymmetrically placed ear cavities.

By visiting this site; you too can enjoy the unique events I've been privileged to witness. You will also have the opportunity to purchase your favourite prints or enjoy these images on a variety of products to remind you of the unique world in which we all live...Enjoy!!

Captive Kestrel @ Dalhousie Castle # 6210

Tagged along on photography workshop at Dalhousie Castle; organized by Ron McCombe. The captive / displaying birds of prey are nurtured and cared for by Falconary Scotland at this idealic setting. The opportunity to get up close to this Kestrel was a real bonus. This energetic raptor was my favourite on the day. The burnt tree setting added something different. Thanks to all who attended, I enjoyed the company.
© Allan Bell

Captive Male Merlin @ Dalhousie Castle # 6049

Tagged along on photography workshop at Dalhousie Castle; organized by Ron McCombe. The captive / displaying birds of prey are nurtured and cared for by Falconary Scotland at this idealic setting. The male Merlin sitting atop this small evergreen is a classic pose that is very difficult to get up this close in the wild. Thanks to all who attended, I enjoyed the company.
© Allan Bell

Captive Tawny Owl @ Dalhousie Castle # 5956

Tagged along on photography workshop at Dalhousie Castle; organized by Ron McCombe. The captive / displaying birds of prey are nurtured and cared for by Falconary Scotland at this idealic setting. We were challenged with photographing the Tawny Owl while strolling the forest path. The opportunity to get up close to these majestic raptors is a real treat. Thanks to all who attended, I enjoyed the company.
© Allan Bell

European Eagle Owl # 2071

The Eurasian Eagle-Owl (Bubo bubo) is a species of eagle owl resident in much of Eurasia. It is also one of the largest species of owls. The Eagle Owl is a very large and powerful bird, smaller than the Golden Eagle but larger than the Snowy Owl. It is sometimes referred to as the world's largest owl, although Blakiston's Fish Owl is slightly heavier on average and the Great Grey Owl is slightly longer on average.
© Allan Bell

European Eagle Owl # 2188

The European Eagle Owl can live for 20 years in the wild although like many other bird species in captivity they can live much longer, perhaps up to 60 years. Adults have no natural predators are thus considered apex predators. Man-made causes are the leading cause of death for this species: electrocution, traffic accidents and shooting sometimes claim the eagle-owl. This close up was taken at philiphaugh sawmill in the scottish borders.
© Allan Bell

European Eagle Owl # 2108

The Eagle Owl can live for 20 years in the wild although like many other bird species in captivity they can live much longer, perhaps up to 60 years. Adults have no natural predators are thus considered apex predators. Man-made causes are the leading cause of death for this species: electrocution, traffic accidents and shooting sometimes claim the eagle-owl. This majestic bird of prey takes a snooze in the comfort of it's captive habitat at philiphaugh sawmill in the scottish borders.
© Allan Bell

Tengmalm's Owl # 300

Boreal Owl, Aegolius funereus, is a small owl. It is also known as the Tengmalm's Owl after Swedish naturalist Peter Gustaf Tengmalm. Other names for the owl include Richardson's Owl, Funeral Owl, Sparrow Owl and Pearl Owl This species is a part of the larger grouping of owls known as typical owls, Strigidae, which contains most species of owl. The Boreal Owl is 22–27 centimetres long with a 50–62 centimetres wingspan. It is brown above, with white flecking on the shoulders. Below it is whitish streaked rust color. The head is large, with yellow eyes and a white facial disc, and a "surprised" appearance. The beak is yellow light colored r
© Allan Bell

Snowy Owl # 200

The Snowy Owl (Bubo Scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. The Snowy Owl was first classified in 1758 by Carolus Linnaeus, the Swedish naturalist who developed binomial nomenclature to classify and organize plants and animals. The bird is also known in North America as the Arctic Owl, Great White Owl or Harfang. It is very closely related to the horned owls in the genus Bubo. The Snowy Owl is the official bird of Quebec.
© Allan Bell

Great Grey Owl # 100

The Great Grey Owl or Lapland Owl (Strix nebulosa) is a very large owl. In some areas it is also called the Great Gray Ghost, Phantom of the north, Cinereous Owl, Spectral Owl, Lapland Owl, Spruce Owl, Bearded Owl and Sooty Owl. Adults have a big, rounded head with a gray face and yellow eyes with darker circles around them. The underparts are light with dark streaks; the upper parts are gray with pale bars. This owl does not have ear tufts and has the largest facial disc of any raptor.
© Allan Bell

Short Eared Owl # 001

The Short-Eared Owl (Asio flammeus) is a species of typical owl (family Strigidae). In Scotland this species of owl is often referred to as a cataface, grass owl or short-horned hootlet. Owls belonging to genus Asio are known as the eared owls, as they have tufts of feathers resembling mammalian ears. These "ear" tufts may or may not be visible. Asio flammeus will display its tufts when in a defensive pose.
© Allan Bell

Short Eared Owl # 002

The Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus) is a species of typical owl (family Strigidae). In Scotland this species of owl is often referred to as a cataface, grass owl or short-horned hootlet. Owls belonging to genus Asio are known as the eared owls, as they have tufts of feathers resembling mammalian ears. These "ear" tufts may or may not be visible. Asio flammeus will display its tufts when in a defensive pose.
© Allan Bell

Short Eared Owl # 1266

The Short Eared Owl (Asio flammeus) is a species of typical owl (family Strigidae). In Scotland this species of owl is often referred to as a cataface, grass owl or short-horned hootlet. Owls belonging to genus Asio are known as the eared owls, as they have tufts of feathers resembling mammalian ears. These "ear" tufts may or may not be visible. Asio flammeus will display its tufts when in a defensive pose. However, its very short tufts are usually not visible. The Short-eared Owl is found in open country and grasslands.
© Allan Bell

Short Eared Owl # 1660

The Short-Eared Owl (Asio flammeus) is a species of typical owl (family Strigidae). In Scotland this species of owl is often referred to as a cataface, grass owl or short-horned hootlet. Owls belonging to genus Asio are known as the eared owls, as they have tufts of feathers resembling mammalian ears. These "ear" tufts may or may not be visible. Asio flammeus will display its tufts when in a defensive pose.
© Allan Bell

European Eagle Owl # 001

The European Eagle Owl is a very large and powerful bird, smaller than the Golden Eagle but larger than the Snowy Owl. The great size, ear tufts and orange eyes make this a distinctive species. The ear tufts of males are more upright than those of females. The upperparts are brown-black and tawny-buff, showing as dense freckling on the forehead and crown, stripes on the nape, sides and back of the neck, and dark splotches on the pale ground colour of the back, mantle and scapulars. A narrow buff band, freckled with brown buff, runs up from the base of the bill, above the inner part of the eye and along the inner edge of the black-brown ear tu
© Allan Bell

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